#build-dependencies #ispc #simd

ispc

A build-time dependency for Cargo build scripts to help with compiling and linking to ISPC code and generating Rust bindings for the resulting library. This crate is a meta-crate for the ispc_compile and ispc_rt crates, which provide the actual functionality for building ISPC code and generating bindgs, and importing those bindings into Rust

22 releases (8 stable)

1.0.7 Jul 4, 2019
1.0.5 Feb 25, 2019
0.3.8 Nov 11, 2018
0.3.5 Jun 4, 2018
0.3.0 Jul 15, 2016

#7 in Build Utils

Download history 142/week @ 2019-03-21 26/week @ 2019-03-28 23/week @ 2019-04-04 19/week @ 2019-04-11 16/week @ 2019-04-18 13/week @ 2019-04-25 28/week @ 2019-05-02 46/week @ 2019-05-09 55/week @ 2019-05-16 46/week @ 2019-05-23 88/week @ 2019-05-30 44/week @ 2019-06-06 11/week @ 2019-06-13 68/week @ 2019-06-20 278/week @ 2019-06-27

245 downloads per month

MIT license

83KB
991 lines

ispc-rs

A small library meant to be used as a build dependency with Cargo for easily integrating ISPC code into Rust projects. ispc-rs is split into two crates: a compile time crate ispc_compile and a runtime crate ispc_rt. This split allows library authors to avoid pushing unecessary dependencies onto end users of the library, who do not plan to modify the ISPC code. The ispc-rs crate is also provided, which bundles the compile time and runtime crates into a convenient single crate, if this separation isn't needed.

Crates.io Build Status

Documentation

Rust doc can be found here, ISPC documentation can be found here.

Using ispc-rs

With ispc-rs you can compile your ISPC code from your build script to generate a native library and a Rust module containing bindings to the exported ISPC functions. ispc-rs will output commands to Cargo to link the native library, and you can import the Rust bindings into your code using a provided macro to call into the library. Using ispc-rs in this mode requires that the ISPC compiler and clang are available when compiling your crate.

When writing a crate or program which wants to package and use ISPC code, but not necessarily require these dependencies on the end user's system, ispc-rs is actually split into two crates: a compile time crate (ispc_compile) and a runtime crate (ispc_rt). The ispc_compile crate is used to compile the ISPC code in a build script, generating the native library and Rust bindings. The ispc_rt crate contains lightweight code to include in the build script which will find and link against the previously compiled native libraries, and a macro to import the previously generated Rust bindings. The recommended use case is to include ispc_compile as an optional dependency behind a feature gate. When building with this feature gate the ISPC code will be built, otherwise the runtime crate will find and use the existing libraries.

Using ispc-rs as a Single Crate

To use ispc-rs as a single crate, you'll want to add a build script to your crate (build.rs), tell Cargo about it, and add ispc-rs as a build time and compile time dependency

# Cargo.toml
[package]
# ...
build = "build.rs"

[dependencies]
ispc = "1.0.7"

[build-dependencies]
ispc = "1.0.7"

Now you can use ispc to compile your code into a static library:

extern crate ispc;

fn main() {
    // Compile our ISPC library, this call will exit with EXIT_FAILURE if
    // compilation fails.
    ispc::compile_library("simple", &["src/simple.ispc"]);
}

Running cargo build should now build your ISPC files into a library and link your Rust application with it. For extra convenience the ispc_module macro is provided to import bindings to the library generated with rust-bindgen into a module of the same name. Note that all the functions imported will be unsafe as they're the raw C bindings to your lib.

#[macro_use]
extern crate ispc;

// Functions exported from simple will be callable under simple::*
ispc_module!(simple);

Requirements for Compiling ISPC Code

Both the ISPC compiler and libclang (for rust-bindgen) must be available in your path to compile the ISPC code and generate the bindings. These are not required if using ispc_rt to link against a previously compiled library.

Windows Users

You'll need Visual Studio and will have to use the MSVC ABI version of Rust since ISPC and Clang link with MSVC on Windows. For bindgen to find libclang you'll need to copy libclang.lib to clang.lib and place it in your path.

Using the Separate Compile and Runtime Crates

The process of using the separate crates is similar to that of the single crate; however, you'll use the individual ispc_compile and ispc_rt crates, with the former marked as an optional dependency. This will allow end users to use the crate and leverage its ISPC code, without needing to re-build the code on their machine. For this reason, it's also recommended to build your ISPC code for multiple vector ISAs, to allow for portability across CPU architectures. You'll also need to package a compiled ISPC library for each host target triple. This can be done by building your crate with the ispc feature enabled on each target host system you want to support users of your library on. Note that users of your crate on a system you haven't provided a binary for can still compile the ISPC code themselves, by using your crate with the ispc feature enabled.

# Cargo.toml
[package]
# ...
build = "build.rs"

[dependencies]
ispc_rt = "1.0.3"

[build-dependencies]
ispc_rt = "1.0.3"
ispc_compile = { "1.0.7", optional = true }

[features]
ispc = ["ispc_compile"]

In the build script we can now use the ispc feature to optionally compile the ispc code using ispc_compile, otherwise we'll link the previously built code with ispc_rt. Here we'll also output the compiled ISPC libraries and bindings into the src/ directory.

extern crate ispc_rt;
#[cfg(feature = "ispc")]
extern crate ispc_compile;

#[cfg(feature = "ispc")]
fn link_ispc() {
    use ispc_compile::TargetISA;
    ispc_compile::Config::new()
        .file("src/simple.ispc")
        .target_isas(vec![
            TargetISA::SSE2i32x4,
            TargetISA::SSE4i32x4,
            TargetISA::AVX1i32x8,
            TargetISA::AVX2i32x8,
            TargetISA::AVX512KNLi32x16,
            TargetISA::AVX512SKXi32x16])
        .out_dir("src/")
        .compile("simple");
}

#[cfg(not(feature = "ispc"))]
fn link_ispc() {
    ispc_rt::PackagedModule::new("simple")
        .lib_path("src/")
        .link();
}

fn main() {
    link_ispc();
}

Running cargo build --features ispc will now build your ISPC files into a library and generate bindings for your exported ISPC functions. The compiled library and generated bindings file will be saved under src/, to allow packaging with the rest of the crate. When building with cargo build, the previously compiled library for the host system will be linked against.

Whether building with or without the ispc feature, you can import the generated bindings into your rust code with the ispc_module! macro as before:

#[macro_use]
extern crate ispc;

// Functions exported from simple will be callable under simple::*
ispc_module!(simple);

Some more complete examples can be found in the examples/ folder. The separate crates example is here

Dependencies

~6MB
~102K SLoC