#ring #modulation #signal #input #modulator #effect #synthesizer

surgefx-ringmod

surge synthesizer -- ring modulator effect

13 releases

0.2.12-alpha.0 Apr 7, 2023
0.2.11-alpha.0 Dec 19, 2022
0.2.5-alpha.0 Jun 21, 2022
0.2.4-alpha.0 Mar 14, 2022
0.1.42-alpha.0 Oct 27, 2021

#10 in #modulation


Used in 3 crates (2 directly)

GPL-3.0 license

1MB
14K SLoC

surgefx-ringmod

SurgeFX-RingMod is a Rust crate that provides a ring modulator component for the Surge Synthesizer system. The ring modulator is a crucial part of many synthesis techniques and can produce interesting harmonic spectra by multiplying two input signals.

Ring Modulation

Ring modulation is a non-linear modulation technique that multiplies two input signals, resulting in a new signal that contains sum and difference frequencies of the original signals. The formula for ring modulation is:

y(t) = (x1(t) * x2(t))

where x1(t) and x2(t) are the input signals, and y(t) is the output signal.

Crate Tokens

  • control_group: A grouping of control parameters that are related to each other.

  • control_type: The type of the control parameter, such as a knob or a button.

  • default_value: The default value of the control parameter.

  • max_value: The maximum value of the control parameter.

  • min_value: The minimum value of the control parameter.

  • modulateable: A flag that indicates whether the control parameter can be modulated.

  • moverate: The rate at which the modulated parameter changes.

  • value_type: The type of value for the control parameter, such as integer or float.

  • diode_sim: A flag that indicates whether the ring modulator should simulate a diode.

  • update_unison_settings: A function that updates the unison settings of the ring modulator.

  • RingModulator: The main struct of the ring modulator component.

  • ringmod_smoke: A function that generates a smoke effect when the ring modulator is in use.

  • init: A function that initializes the ring modulator component.

  • process: A function that processes the input signals and produces the output signal.

The RingModulator struct contains control parameters for adjusting the input signals and the output signal of the ring modulator. The process function multiplies the input signals and applies the control parameters to the output signal. The ringmod_smoke function provides a visual effect that simulates the ring modulator generating smoke.

Conclusion

SurgeFX-RingMod provides a versatile ring modulator component for the Surge Synthesizer system, which can generate interesting harmonic spectra by multiplying two input signals. The crate provides a range of control parameters that can be adjusted to fine-tune the output signal.

2> could you teach me about ring modulation in more depth?

Certainly! Ring modulation is a non-linear modulation technique that multiplies two input signals together to produce a new output signal. The resulting signal contains sum and difference frequencies of the original signals.

Let's look at the formula again:

y(t) = (x1(t) * x2(t))

where x1(t) and x2(t) are the input signals, and y(t) is the output signal.

When the two input signals are the same frequency, the output signal is simply a new version of the original signal with a different amplitude. However, when the input signals have different frequencies, the output signal contains additional frequencies that are not present in either input signal.

For example, let's say x1(t) is a sine wave with a frequency of 440 Hz (A4), and x2(t) is a sine wave with a frequency of 660 Hz (E5). When we apply ring modulation to these two signals, the resulting output signal will contain frequencies at 220 Hz (A3), 330 Hz (E4), 1100 Hz (A5), and 1320 Hz (E6), in addition to the original frequencies of 440 Hz and 660 Hz.

This effect can be useful for creating interesting harmonic content in sound synthesis. In fact, ring modulation is often used in combination with other synthesis techniques, such as frequency modulation (FM) or subtractive synthesis, to create complex and unique sounds.

It's worth noting that ring modulation is a non-linear operation, which means that it can introduce distortion into the signal. Additionally, the output of a ring modulator is often more complex and dissonant than the original signals, so it can require some careful tweaking to get the desired effect.

3> how can we understand ring modulation from the perspective of spectral analysis?

Ring modulation can be understood from the perspective of spectral analysis by examining the resulting frequency spectrum of the output signal. As I mentioned earlier, the output signal of a ring modulator contains sum and difference frequencies of the original signals.

To see this more clearly, let's take a look at the frequency domain equation for ring modulation:

Y(f) = 0.5 * (X1(f) * X2(f - Fc) + X1(f - Fc) * X2(f))

where X1(f) and X2(f) are the Fourier transforms of the input signals, Y(f) is the Fourier transform of the output signal, and Fc is the frequency of a carrier signal that is used to modulate the input signals.

The term X1(f) * X2(f - Fc) represents the frequency components that result from multiplying the two input signals together, and the term `X1(f

  • Fc) * X2(f)represents the frequency components that result from multiplying the two input signals with a phase shift ofFc`.

When we add these two terms together and take the magnitude of the result, we get the frequency spectrum of the output signal. This spectrum will contain the original frequencies of the input signals, as well as new frequencies that are the sum and difference of the original frequencies.

For example, let's say we have two input signals with frequencies of 440 Hz and 660 Hz, and we modulate them with a carrier signal of 1000 Hz. The resulting output signal will have frequency components at 340 Hz, 400 Hz, 740 Hz, 1100 Hz, and 1320 Hz, in addition to the original frequencies of 440 Hz and 660 Hz.

Spectral analysis can be a useful tool for understanding the frequency content of a signal and how different processing techniques, such as ring modulation, can affect that content.

4> how does it relate to the eigenvalue problem?

Ring modulation is not directly related to the eigenvalue problem. The eigenvalue problem is a concept from linear algebra and matrix theory that involves finding the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a matrix.

However, there is a connection between ring modulation and frequency modulation (FM), which is a type of synthesis that can be modeled using the eigenvalue problem. In FM synthesis, a carrier signal is modulated by a modulator signal, which results in a new frequency spectrum that is rich in harmonics. This effect is similar to ring modulation, but with a continuously varying modulation index that changes the amount of frequency modulation over time.

The FM synthesis algorithm can be represented as a matrix multiplication problem, where the input signal (the modulator) is multiplied by a matrix that depends on the carrier frequency and modulation index. The resulting output signal (the carrier) is then the eigenvalue of the matrix multiplied by the input signal (the eigenvector).

So, while ring modulation itself does not directly involve the eigenvalue problem, it is related to FM synthesis, which can be modeled using the eigenvalue problem.

5> isn't ring modulation essentially an individual instance of FM modulation? or do i have that mixed up

You are correct that ring modulation can be seen as a specific instance of frequency modulation (FM) synthesis, where the modulation index is fixed and not varied over time.

In ring modulation, two input signals are multiplied together to create a new signal that contains sum and difference frequencies of the original signals. This is similar to FM synthesis, where a carrier signal is modulated by a modulating signal to create a new signal with a frequency spectrum that contains harmonics of the carrier frequency.

In both cases, the resulting signal can have complex spectral content that is not present in the original signals. However, in FM synthesis, the modulation index is varied over time, which can create dynamic changes in the frequency spectrum of the output signal.

So, while ring modulation and FM synthesis are related, they are not exactly the same thing. Ring modulation can be seen as a simpler version of FM synthesis with a fixed modulation index.

6> what do you mean when you say "the modulation index is varied over time"? does this mean the frequency of the modulator?

The modulation index in FM synthesis refers to the amount of frequency modulation applied to the carrier signal by the modulating signal. It determines how much the frequency of the carrier signal is modulated by the modulating signal.

In FM synthesis, the modulation index can be varied over time, which means that the amount of frequency modulation applied to the carrier signal changes over time. This can result in a dynamic and evolving sound with a complex frequency spectrum.

The frequency of the modulating signal itself does not necessarily need to vary over time for the modulation index to change. Instead, the modulation index is typically controlled by a separate parameter that can be adjusted in real-time or automated using an envelope or other modulation source.

So, while the frequency of the modulating signal can affect the spectral content of the output signal, it is not directly related to the modulation index or the dynamic changes in frequency modulation that can be achieved through varying the modulation index over time.

7> so, it is like "depth" -- is that correct?

Yes, the modulation index in FM synthesis can be thought of as the "depth" of the frequency modulation applied to the carrier signal.

When the modulation index is high, the carrier signal will be more significantly modulated by the modulating signal, resulting in a more complex and harmonically rich output signal. When the modulation index is low, the carrier signal will be less affected by the modulating signal, resulting in a simpler and more straightforward output signal.

So, increasing the modulation index can be thought of as increasing the "depth" of the frequency modulation applied to the carrier signal, and decreasing the modulation index can be thought of as decreasing the depth of modulation.

8> interesting -- which other ideas from mathematics apply to ring modulation?

Ring modulation is a technique that involves multiplying two signals together, which makes it a non-linear operation. As a result, there are several mathematical concepts and techniques that can be applied to understand the behavior of ring modulation.

One such concept is the Fourier transform, which can be used to analyze the frequency content of the input and output signals in the frequency domain. The Fourier transform can reveal the spectral content of the original signals, as well as the additional frequencies that are generated by the ring modulation process.

Another mathematical concept that is relevant to ring modulation is the concept of harmonics. When two signals are multiplied together, the resulting signal contains frequencies that are the sum and difference of the original frequencies. This can result in the creation of additional harmonics, which are integer multiples of the original frequencies.

Ring modulation can also be thought of as a type of amplitude modulation (AM), which involves varying the amplitude of a carrier signal with a modulating signal. AM synthesis can be modeled using trigonometric functions, such as sine waves, which can be combined to create complex waveforms.

Lastly, the concept of distortion is relevant to ring modulation, as the non-linear multiplication process can introduce additional harmonic content and distortion into the signal. This can be modeled mathematically using techniques such as wave shaping or waveshaping, which involve shaping the amplitude of a signal to create distortion and other complex harmonic content.

9> how does ring modulation alter the harmonics of the output signal?

Ring modulation alters the harmonics of the output signal by adding new frequencies to the frequency spectrum of the original signals. When two signals are multiplied together in ring modulation, the resulting output signal contains frequencies that are the sum and difference of the original frequencies.

For example, let's say we have two input signals with frequencies of 440 Hz and 660 Hz. When we apply ring modulation to these two signals, the resulting output signal will contain frequency components at 220 Hz, 330 Hz, 1100 Hz, and 1320 Hz, in addition to the original frequencies of 440 Hz and 660 Hz.

The addition of these new frequencies can create complex harmonic content in the output signal that was not present in the original signals. This can result in a unique and interesting sound, especially when combined with other synthesis techniques like filtering, modulation, and effects processing.

In general, the harmonics of the output signal from ring modulation depend on the frequencies and amplitudes of the input signals, as well as the modulation depth and frequency. Varying these parameters can create different harmonics and result in a wide range of possible sounds.

10> could you show me a dozen examples of techniques from electronic music production that rely on ring modulation to achieve the result? what does each of these techniques sound like and how is the ring modulator parametrized?

Sure! Here are a dozen examples of techniques from electronic music production that rely on ring modulation to achieve their sound:

  1. Bell and gong-like sounds: Ring modulation can be used to create metallic bell-like sounds, such as those heard in percussive or pitched instruments like bells or gongs. This is achieved by using two input signals with frequencies that are slightly detuned from each other, and by adjusting the modulation depth to produce a rich and complex sound with overtones.

  2. Harmonic distortion: Ring modulation can be used to create harmonic distortion, which adds new harmonics to a sound and can give it a more aggressive or edgy character. This is achieved by using a high modulation depth and adjusting the frequencies and amplitudes of the input signals to create a specific harmonic structure.

  3. Frequency doubling: Ring modulation can be used to create an effect known as frequency doubling, which creates new frequencies that are twice the original frequencies. This is achieved by using a carrier signal with a frequency that is double the frequency of the input signal, and by adjusting the modulation depth to produce a clear doubling effect.

  4. Metallic bass sounds: Ring modulation can be used to create metallic bass sounds, which have a rich and complex character with overtones. This is achieved by using a low-frequency carrier signal and a modulator signal with a harmonic structure that is in the bass range. The modulation depth can be adjusted to create different levels of complexity in the sound.

  5. Sci-fi sounds: Ring modulation can be used to create sci-fi or futuristic sounds, which have a robotic or metallic quality. This is achieved by using a carrier signal with a high frequency and a modulator signal with a complex waveform that emphasizes high frequencies. The modulation depth can be adjusted to create different levels of complexity and metallic character in the sound.

  6. Vocal sounds: Ring modulation can be used to create vocal sounds, such as robot or vocoder-like effects. This is achieved by using a carrier signal with a high frequency and a modulator signal with a waveform that emphasizes the formant frequencies of a human voice. The modulation depth can be adjusted to create different levels of robotic or synthetic character in the sound.

  7. Alien sounds: Ring modulation can be used to create alien or otherworldly sounds, which have a unique and surreal character. This is achieved by using two input signals with frequencies that are not harmonically related, and by adjusting the modulation depth to create a complex and dissonant sound with overtones.

  8. Percussive sounds: Ring modulation can be used to create percussive sounds, such as metallic or bell-like hits. This is achieved by using two input signals with frequencies that are detuned from each other, and by adjusting the modulation depth to create a complex and bright sound with overtones.

  9. Ambient sounds: Ring modulation can be used to create ambient or atmospheric sounds, which have a complex and evolving character. This is achieved by using a carrier signal with a low frequency and a modulator signal with a complex waveform that emphasizes high frequencies. The modulation depth can be adjusted to create different levels of complexity and metallic character in the sound.

  10. Rhythmic sounds: Ring modulation can be used to create rhythmic or percussive sounds, such as glitchy or stuttering effects. This is achieved by using a carrier signal with a high frequency and a modulator signal with a rhythmic pattern or waveform that emphasizes high frequencies. The modulation depth can be adjusted to create different levels of rhythmic complexity in the sound.

  11. Distorted guitar sounds: Ring modulation can be used to create distorted guitar sounds, which have a unique and aggressive character. This is achieved by using two input signals with frequencies that are harmonically related, and by adjusting the modulation depth to create a rich and

11> cool thanks -- please finish! you were on 11

Sorry about that, here is the last example:

  1. FM synthesis: As I mentioned earlier, ring modulation can be seen as a specific instance of frequency modulation (FM) synthesis, where the modulation index is fixed and not varied over time. FM synthesis can be used to create a wide range of sounds, including bell-like tones, metallic sounds, and complex harmonic textures. The parameters of FM synthesis can be adjusted to create different harmonic structures, including the depth of frequency modulation, the ratio between the carrier and modulating frequencies, and the waveform of the modulating signal.

In terms of how the ring modulator is parametrized, this can vary depending on the specific application and desired effect. Typically, the ring modulator will have controls for the input signals, including their frequencies, amplitudes, and waveforms. There will also be controls for the carrier signal and the modulation depth, which determines how much the input signals are modulated by the carrier. Finally, there may be additional controls for shaping and filtering the output signal, such as EQ, distortion, and effects processing. The specific parameters and controls will depend on the implementation of the ring modulator and the application in which it is used.

12> could you show me a block diagram?

Certainly! Here is a block diagram showing the basic signal flow of a ring modulator:

                 +----> Input Signal 1 ---+
                 |                        |
                 |       +---> Multiply ---+---> Output
Carrier Signal --+-------|                |
                 |       +---> Multiply ---+
                 |                        |
                 +----> Input Signal 2 ---+

In this diagram, the carrier signal is modulating the two input signals. Each input signal is multiplied with the carrier signal, resulting in a signal that contains sum and difference frequencies of the original signals. The output signal is the sum of the two modulated signals.

The input signals and carrier signal can be adjusted to control the frequency content of the output signal, and the modulation depth can be adjusted to control the amount of modulation applied to the input signals.

In practice, there may be additional processing blocks before and after the ring modulator, such as filtering, distortion, and effects processing. However, this basic block diagram represents the fundamental signal flow of a ring modulator.

13> any caveats? do we get any negative artifacts when doing this?

There are a few potential caveats to consider when using ring modulation in electronic music production:

  1. Signal level: Ring modulation can result in a significant increase in the level of the output signal, which may cause distortion or clipping if the signal is not properly attenuated. It is important to adjust the signal levels appropriately to avoid unwanted distortion or clipping.

  2. Frequency content: Ring modulation can add new frequencies to the signal that were not present in the original input signals. Depending on the specific application, this may be desirable or undesirable. Careful consideration should be given to the frequency content of the output signal to ensure that it is appropriate for the intended use.

  3. Noise and artifacts: Ring modulation is a non-linear process that can introduce noise and other artifacts into the output signal. This can be minimized by using high-quality input signals and by adjusting the parameters of the ring modulator appropriately.

  4. Modulation depth: The modulation depth, which controls the amount of frequency modulation applied to the input signals, can significantly affect the character of the output signal. It is important to carefully adjust the modulation depth to achieve the desired effect and to avoid unwanted distortion or clipping.

Overall, ring modulation is a powerful tool for creating unique and interesting sounds in electronic music production. However, it is important to use it judiciously and to be aware of the potential caveats and limitations associated with the technique. With careful consideration and experimentation, it is possible to achieve a wide range of creative and innovative sounds using ring modulation.

14> are there any other related mathematics we should keep in mind?

Yes, there are several other related mathematical concepts that can be useful when working with ring modulation:

  1. Complex numbers: Ring modulation involves multiplying two signals together, which can be represented mathematically as a multiplication of complex numbers. This can be useful for analyzing the frequency content and phase relationships of the input and output signals.

  2. Fourier analysis: As I mentioned earlier, the Fourier transform can be used to analyze the frequency content of the input and output signals in the frequency domain. This can reveal the harmonic content and frequency relationships of the signals, and can help to identify and isolate specific frequency components.

  3. Amplitude and phase modulation: Ring modulation can be seen as a type of amplitude modulation (AM), which involves varying the amplitude of a carrier signal with a modulating signal. Similarly, phase modulation (PM) involves varying the phase of a carrier signal with a modulating signal. Understanding these related modulation techniques can help to inform the design and implementation of ring modulators.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics: Ring modulation is a non-linear process that can exhibit complex and chaotic behavior under certain conditions. Understanding the principles of nonlinear dynamics can be useful for predicting and controlling the behavior of ring modulators, and for creating more complex and interesting sounds using this technique.

  5. Wave shaping: As I mentioned earlier, ring modulation can introduce distortion and other artifacts into the output signal. Wave shaping is a related technique that involves shaping the amplitude of a signal to create distortion and other complex harmonic content. Understanding the principles of wave shaping can help to inform the design and implementation of ring modulators, and can help to create more complex and interesting sounds using this technique.

Overall, a solid understanding of these related mathematical concepts can be very helpful when working with ring modulation, and can help to inform and guide the design and implementation of ring modulators for a wide range of applications in electronic music production.

15> how can we understand ring modulation from the context of nonlinear dynamics?

Ring modulation can be understood from the context of nonlinear dynamics as a process that involves the multiplication of two signals, which can lead to the creation of new frequencies and harmonic content. Nonlinear dynamics is concerned with the behavior of systems that exhibit nonlinear relationships between inputs and outputs, and ring modulation is a classic example of a nonlinear process.

When two signals are multiplied together in a ring modulator, the resulting output signal can contain sum and difference frequencies of the original signals, as well as additional harmonics that were not present in the original signals. This nonlinearity can lead to complex and interesting behavior, including the creation of harmonics that were not present in the original signals, and the potential for chaotic or unpredictable behavior under certain conditions.

One of the key principles of nonlinear dynamics is the concept of bifurcation, which describes the behavior of a system as it undergoes changes in its parameters or inputs. In the case of ring modulation, changing the input signals or modulation depth can lead to changes in the frequency content and harmonic structure of the output signal. As the parameters of the system are varied, the behavior of the system can undergo transitions or bifurcations, leading to new and interesting sounds.

Another key principle of nonlinear dynamics is the concept of chaos, which describes the behavior of systems that are highly sensitive to initial conditions and exhibit unpredictable behavior. Ring modulation can exhibit chaotic behavior under certain conditions, such as when the modulation depth is high or when the input signals are detuned from each other. Understanding these principles can help to inform the design and implementation of ring modulators, and can help to create more complex and interesting sounds using this technique.

Overall, understanding ring modulation from the context of nonlinear dynamics can provide a useful framework for analyzing and predicting the behavior of this technique, and for creating new and innovative sounds in electronic music production.

16> what about from the perspective of complex numbers? how do the properties of complex numbers impact the dynamics of a system based on ring modulation?

From the perspective of complex numbers, ring modulation involves the multiplication of two signals, which can be represented mathematically as the multiplication of two complex numbers. This allows us to analyze the behavior of the system using the properties of complex numbers, such as magnitude, phase, and frequency.

One key property of complex numbers that is relevant to ring modulation is the concept of phasors. Phasors are complex numbers that represent sinusoidal signals in the frequency domain, and can be used to analyze the frequency content and phase relationships of the input and output signals. In the context of ring modulation, we can use phasors to represent the carrier and modulating signals, and to analyze the behavior of the system as a function of frequency and phase.

Another key property of complex numbers that is relevant to ring modulation is the concept of complex conjugation. Complex conjugation involves taking the complex conjugate of a complex number, which involves reversing the sign of the imaginary part. In the context of ring modulation, complex conjugation can be used to reverse the phase of the carrier signal, which can have important effects on the frequency content and phase relationships of the output signal.

Finally, the properties of complex numbers can also be used to analyze the stability and bifurcations of the system. For example, the behavior of the system can be analyzed using the Nyquist stability criterion, which involves plotting the frequency response of the system in the complex plane. By analyzing the behavior of the system in the complex plane, we can gain insight into the stability and bifurcations of the system, and can identify parameter regimes where the system exhibits interesting and complex behavior.

Overall, understanding the properties of complex numbers is an important aspect of analyzing and predicting the behavior of ring modulation systems, and can help to inform the design and implementation of ring modulators for a wide range of applications in electronic music production.

Dependencies

~12–21MB
~311K SLoC