#tree #set #priority #red #balanced

rb_tree

A Red Black Tree implementation in Rust

9 unstable releases (3 breaking)

0.4.1 May 20, 2021
0.4.0 Apr 18, 2021
0.3.5 Feb 27, 2021
0.3.1 Dec 13, 2020
0.1.1 Aug 13, 2020

#180 in Data structures

Download history 4/week @ 2021-05-30 14/week @ 2021-06-06 2/week @ 2021-06-13 3/week @ 2021-06-20 2/week @ 2021-06-27 3/week @ 2021-07-04 7/week @ 2021-07-11 15/week @ 2021-07-18 18/week @ 2021-07-25 27/week @ 2021-08-01 6/week @ 2021-08-08 24/week @ 2021-08-15 22/week @ 2021-08-22 6/week @ 2021-08-29 4/week @ 2021-09-05 8/week @ 2021-09-12

316 downloads per month
Used in intersect2d

MIT/Apache

130KB
3K SLoC

rb_tree

This crate contains an implementation of the red-black tree data structure and several data structures that are built on top of this implementation. The data structures currently include RBTree, RBMap, and RBQueue.

Data Structures

RBTree

This data structure can be used as a set and has methods to support its use as a set. Methods specific to this data structure include set operations such as union, difference etc. Values are stored in their PartialOrd ordering.

RBMap

This data structure provides an interface for using the RBTree as a map. Values in the map are ordered by their keys' PartialOrd ordering.

RBQueue

This data structure allows the use of the underlying red-black tree as a priority queue. A comparison function is provided on instantiation (either with RBQueue::new(Fn(&T, &T) -> std::cmp::Ordering) or new_c_queue!(Fn(&T, &T) -> i8)) which is used to order the entries.

Features

The above data structures can be optionally excluded (all are included by default). If you are only using one or two of the types you can exclude the other(s) to help minimise your binary size. However, because RBMap is a wrapper type for RBTree including the former will always include the latter. To do this, add to your dependencies:

[dependencies]
rb_tree = { version = "*", default-features = false, features = ["map" | "set" | "queue"]}

This will add to your binary the RBMap, RBTree, and RBQueue types respectively. It is important you set default-features to false as all features are enabled by default.

See here for more info about cargo's feature system.

Examples

use rb_tree::RBTree;

// uses an rbtree to sort data
fn sort<T: PartialOrd>(to_order: Vec<T>) -> Vec<T> {
    let mut tree = RBTree::new();
    let mut ordered = Vec::new();
    for v in to_order {
        tree.insert(v);
    }
    while let Some(v) = tree.pop() {
        ordered.push(v);
    }
    ordered
}

fn main() {
    let eg1 = vec!(3, 6, 1, 2, 0, 4, -1, 5, 10, 11, -13);
    assert_eq!(sort(eg1), vec!(-13, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 11));

    let eg2 = vec!("Is", "this", "the", "real", "life");
    assert_eq!(sort(eg2), vec!("Is", "life", "real", "the", "this"))
}
use rb_tree::RBMap;

fn main() {
    let mut squares = RBMap::new();
    for i in 0..10 {
        squares.insert(i, i);
    }

    squares.values_mut().for_each(|v| *v = (*v as f64).powi(2) as u32);

    for i in 0..10 {
        assert_eq!(*squares.get(&i).unwrap(), (i as f64).powi(2) as u32);
    }
}
#[macro_use(new_c_queue)]
extern crate rb_tree;

use rb_tree::RBQueue;

fn main() {
    
    // use the default comarator
    let mut q1 = RBQueue::new(|l: &i64, r| {
        l.cmp(r)
    });

    // compare in the reverse order
    let mut q2 = new_c_queue!(|l: &i64, r| (r - l));

    q1.insert(1);
    q1.insert(2);
    q1.insert(3);
    q2.insert(1);
    q2.insert(2);
    q2.insert(3);

    assert_eq!(q1.ordered(), [&1, &2, &3]);
    assert_eq!(q2.ordered(), [&3, &2, &1]);
}

License

This project is licensed under the terms of the MIT license.

No runtime deps