#debugging #macro #instant #timing #proc-macro #quickly #time

macro time_this

two macros to quickly time functions for debugging purposes

7 releases

0.2.5 Oct 9, 2023
0.2.4 Mar 24, 2023
0.1.0 Mar 22, 2023

#328 in Procedural macros

Apache-2.0

9KB
61 lines

A proc macro and a macro attribute to quickly time functions. Uses std::time::Instant so relies on std to work.

#[time_this]

This macro can be used to time any function you want using std::time::Instant. Whenever the function gets called, its timing information will be passed to stdout (though in the case of recursive calls, it will only be printed once). It may not work correctly with async fn, in particular when a future is returned but not yet awaited, and it definitely doesn't work with const fn, even if called in a non-const context. If needed, you can write a small wrapping function if you need to time a const fn. It will print:

  • the time in ns if the function took less than 1μs.
  • the time in μs if the function took less than 1ms.
  • the time in ms if the function took longer than 1ms, but less than 1s.
  • the time in s if the function took more than a second, with two decimal digits.
use time_this::time_this;

#[time_this]
fn add(a: u32, b: u32) -> u32 {
    a + b
}

fn main() {
    let result = add(3, 5);
    // function 'add()' took 37ns
}

time!()

This macro can be used to time any expression you want using std::time::Instant. After the expression evaluates, timing information will immediately be passed to stdout and the result will be returned, similar to similar to dbg!(). Similar to time_this, it may not work correctly with async fn. Instead of printing the function name, it will print file/line the expression that was timed at, as well as the expression itself.

use time_this::time;

fn add(a: u32, b: u32) -> u32 {
    a + b
}

fn main() {
    let result = time!(add(3, 5));
    // [tests/tests.rs:33] -> add(3, 5) took 28ns
}

Dependencies

~305–760KB
~18K SLoC