1 stable release

1.0.0 Feb 4, 2021

42 downloads per month
Used in rust-sc2

Custom license

3KB

rust-sc2

Rust implementation of StarCraft II API

The library aims to be simple and easy to use, being very fast and functional at the same time. However, it provides both high and low level abstractions. This lib is inspired by python-sc2 lib, so people might find it easy to switch to rust-sc2. It was originally created because other rust libs were old, not functional and low level.

Feel free to ask questions in #rust channel of these Discord servers:

Getting started

Install Rust >= 1.42.0

Warning: Compilation is broken in rustc 1.45.0 - 1.46.0, you'll get following error:

thread 'rustc' has overflowed its stack
error: could not compile `rust-sc2`.

Add to dependencies in Cargo.toml:

[dependencies]
rust-sc2 = { git = "https://github.com/UltraMachine/rust-sc2" }

The simplest competetive bot in less than 30 lines:

use rust_sc2::prelude::*;

#[bot]
#[derive(Default)]
struct WorkerRush;
impl Player for WorkerRush {
    fn get_player_settings(&self) -> PlayerSettings {
        PlayerSettings::new(Race::Protoss, None)
    }
    fn on_start(&mut self) -> SC2Result<()> {
        for worker in self.units.my.workers.iter() {
            worker.attack(Target::Pos(self.enemy_start), false);
        }
        Ok(())
    }
}

fn main() -> SC2Result<()> {
    let mut bot = WorkerRush::default();
    run_vs_computer(
        &mut bot,
        Computer::new(Race::Random, Difficulty::Medium, None),
        "EternalEmpireLE",
        Default::default(),
    )
}

For more advanced examples see examples folder.

Optional features

  • "rayon" - enables parallelism and makes all types threadsafe
  • "serde" - adds implementation of Serialize, Deserialize to ids, Race, GameResult, ...

Making bot step by step

First of all, import rust-sc2 lib:

use rust_sc2::prelude::*;

Create your bot's struct (Can be Unit or C-like):

#[bot]
struct MyBot;
#[bot]
struct MyBot {
    /* fields here */
}

Then implement Player trait for your bot:

// You mustn't call any of these methods by hands, they're for API only
impl Player for MyBot {
    // Must be implemented
    fn get_player_settings(&self) -> PlayerSettings {
        // Race can be Terran, Zerg, Protoss or Random
        // If bot name is None, it'll be shown as "foo(whatever)" in game
        PlayerSettings::new(Race::Random, Some("Bot Name"))
    }

    // Methods below aren't necessary to implement (Empty by default)

    // Called once on first step
    fn on_start(&mut self) -> SC2Result<()> {
        /* your awesome code here */
    }

    // Called on every game step
    fn on_step(&mut self, iteration: usize) -> SC2Result<()> {
        /* your awesome code here */
    }

    // Called once on last step
    // "result" says if your bot won or lost game
    fn on_end(&self, result: GameResult) -> SC2Result<()> {
        /* your awesome code here */
    }

    // Called on different events, see more in `examples/events.rs`
    fn on_event(&mut self, event: Event) -> SC2Result<()> {
        /* your awesome code here */
    }
}

Also you might want to add method to construct it:

impl MyBot {
    // It's necessary to have #[bot_new] here
    #[bot_new]
    fn new() -> Self {
        Self {
            /* initializing fields */
        }
    }
}

If your bot implements Default you can simply call MyBot::default(), but if you want more control over initializer:

impl MyBot {
    // You don't need #[bot_new] here, because of "..Default::default()"
    fn new() -> Self {
        Self {
            /* initializing fields */
            ..Default::default()
        }
    }
}

The rest is to run it:

fn main() -> SC2Result<()> {
    let mut bot = MyBot::new();
    run_vs_computer(
        &mut bot,
        Computer::new(
            Race::Random,
            Difficulty::VeryEasy,
            None,              // AI Build (random here)
        ),
        "EternalEmpireLE", // Map name
        LaunchOptions::default(),
    )
}

Dependencies

~1.1–2MB
~53K SLoC