#router #path #url #match #tree

pavex_matchit

A fork of matchit, to get some unreleased fixes in Pavex

2 unstable releases

0.7.4 Jan 22, 2024
0.1.0 Jan 22, 2024

#362 in Network programming

Download history 68/week @ 2024-03-03 88/week @ 2024-03-10 133/week @ 2024-03-17 302/week @ 2024-03-24 291/week @ 2024-03-31 269/week @ 2024-04-07 536/week @ 2024-04-14 720/week @ 2024-04-21 268/week @ 2024-04-28 155/week @ 2024-05-05 196/week @ 2024-05-12 397/week @ 2024-05-19 215/week @ 2024-05-26 237/week @ 2024-06-02 223/week @ 2024-06-09 350/week @ 2024-06-16

1,064 downloads per month
Used in 8 crates (2 directly)

MIT AND BSD-3-Clause

52KB
863 lines

matchit

Documentation Version License

A high performance, zero-copy URL router.

use matchit::Router;

fn main() -> Result<(), Box<dyn std::error::Error>> {
    let mut router = Router::new();
    router.insert("/home", "Welcome!")?;
    router.insert("/users/:id", "A User")?;

    let matched = router.at("/users/978")?;
    assert_eq!(matched.params.get("id"), Some("978"));
    assert_eq!(*matched.value, "A User");

    Ok(())
}

Parameters

Along with static routes, the router also supports dynamic route segments. These can either be named or catch-all parameters:

Named Parameters

Named parameters like /:id match anything until the next / or the end of the path:

let mut m = Router::new();
m.insert("/users/:id", true)?;

assert_eq!(m.at("/users/1")?.params.get("id"), Some("1"));
assert_eq!(m.at("/users/23")?.params.get("id"), Some("23"));
assert!(m.at("/users").is_err());

Catch-all Parameters

Catch-all parameters start with * and match anything until the end of the path. They must always be at the end of the route:

let mut m = Router::new();
m.insert("/*p", true)?;

assert_eq!(m.at("/foo.js")?.params.get("p"), Some("foo.js"));
assert_eq!(m.at("/c/bar.css")?.params.get("p"), Some("c/bar.css"));

// note that this would not match:
assert_eq!(m.at("/").is_err());

Routing Priority

Static and dynamic route segments are allowed to overlap. If they do, static segments will be given higher priority:

let mut m = Router::new();
m.insert("/", "Welcome!").unwrap();      // priority: 1
m.insert("/about", "About Me").unwrap(); // priority: 1
m.insert("/*filepath", "...").unwrap();  // priority: 2

How does it work?

The router takes advantage of the fact that URL routes generally follow a hierarchical structure. Routes are stored them in a radix trie that makes heavy use of common prefixes:

Priority   Path             Value
9          \                1
3          ├s               None
2          |├earch\         2
1          |└upport\        3
2          ├blog\           4
1          |    └:post      None
1          |         └\     5
2          ├about-us\       6
1          |        └team\  7
1          └contact\        8

This allows us to reduce the route search to a small number of branches. Child nodes on the same level of the tree are also prioritized by the number of children with registered values, increasing the chance of choosing the correct branch of the first try.

Benchmarks

As it turns out, this method of routing is extremely fast. In a benchmark matching 4 paths against 130 registered routes, matchit find the correct routes in under 200 nanoseconds, an order of magnitude faster than most other routers. You can view the benchmark code here.

Compare Routers/matchit 
time:   [197.57 ns 198.74 ns 199.83 ns]

Compare Routers/actix
time:   [26.805 us 26.811 us 26.816 us]

Compare Routers/path-tree
time:   [468.95 ns 470.34 ns 471.65 ns]

Compare Routers/regex
time:   [22.539 us 22.584 us 22.639 us]

Compare Routers/route-recognizer
time:   [3.7552 us 3.7732 us 3.8027 us]

Compare Routers/routefinder
time:   [5.7313 us 5.7405 us 5.7514 us]

Credits

A lot of the code in this package was based on Julien Schmidt's httprouter.

No runtime deps