#testing #parameterized #macro

parameterized_test

A macro to support providing arguments to test functions

1 unstable release

0.1.0 Dec 1, 2020

#7 in #parameterized

Download history 26/week @ 2022-08-07 21/week @ 2022-08-14 16/week @ 2022-08-21 9/week @ 2022-08-28 14/week @ 2022-09-04 47/week @ 2022-09-11 14/week @ 2022-09-18 14/week @ 2022-09-25 24/week @ 2022-10-02 21/week @ 2022-10-09 27/week @ 2022-10-16 18/week @ 2022-10-23 28/week @ 2022-10-30 21/week @ 2022-11-06 18/week @ 2022-11-13 35/week @ 2022-11-20

108 downloads per month
Used in task-mon

MIT/Apache

5KB

parameterized_test::create!() macro

This small crate provides a parameterized_test::create!() macro to simplify creating repeated tests with different arguments.

Inspired by Chris Morgan's StackOverflow post and originally documented in this answer, this macro works by dynamically generating a new macro which, in turn, generates separate tests for each test case passed to the generated macro.

Note: the exact API is still in development and may change in subsequent (pre-1.0) releases.

Syntax

parameterized_test::create() expects four arguments:

  • A name for the test group, which will be used as the submodule name and the name of the generated parameters macro.
  • One or more variable names, e.g. foo or (bar, baz) (note multiple variables must be parenthesized).
  • The test body, multiple statements can be enclosed in { ... }.

Example

This example creates two test cases, tests::even::bad_case and tests::even::good_case.

use parameterized_test::create;

#[cfg(test)]
mod tests {
    use super::*;

    parameterized_test::create!{ even, n, { assert_eq!(n % 2, 0); } }
    even! {
        bad_case:  1, // this test case will fail
        good_case: 2,
    }
}

This example accepts multiple parameters:

use parameterized_test::create;

#[cfg(test)]
mod tests {
    use super::*;

    parameterized_test::create!{ commutative, (i, j, k), {
      assert_eq!(i, j);
      assert_eq!(j, k);
      assert_eq!(k, i); 
    }}
    commutative! {
        small: (1, 1, 1),
        large: (100, 100, 100),
    }
}

No runtime deps