5 releases

Uses old Rust 2015

0.2.2 Jul 14, 2016
0.2.1 Dec 9, 2015
0.2.0 Nov 11, 2015
0.1.1 Jul 19, 2015
0.1.0 May 18, 2015

#5 in #pcre

Download history 16/week @ 2020-12-17 6/week @ 2020-12-24 25/week @ 2020-12-31 26/week @ 2021-01-07 29/week @ 2021-01-14 28/week @ 2021-01-21 26/week @ 2021-01-28 25/week @ 2021-02-04 37/week @ 2021-02-11 25/week @ 2021-02-18 23/week @ 2021-02-25 9/week @ 2021-03-04 21/week @ 2021-03-11 11/week @ 2021-03-18 39/week @ 2021-03-25 16/week @ 2021-04-01

99 downloads per month
Used in pcre

MIT/Apache

1.5MB
197 lines

rust-pcre

Rust 1.x+ wrapper for libpcre 8.20+.

Build Status

Quick Start

To use rust-pcre, you can either install libpcre 8.20+ and register with pkg-config or you can let rust-pcre build libpcre from source.

Debian

Debian Squeeze's package for libpcre is for version 8.02 of the library, which is too old. You can either install a newer version of libpcre and register it with pkg-config or just let rust-pcre automatically build libpcre from source.

On Debian Wheezy and newer, install the libpcre3-dev package:

sudo apt-get install libpcre3-dev

Fedora

Install the pcre-devel package.

Mac OS X

Mac OS 10.7 ships with version 8.02 of libpcre. You can either install a newer version of libpcre and register it with pkg-config or just let rust-pcre automatically build libpcre from source.

Homebrew is highly recommended for installing libpcre. With Homebrew, installing the latest versions of Rust and libpcre is as simple as:

brew install rust pcre

To upgrade:

brew update && brew upgrade rust pcre

Ubuntu

The libpcre packages for Ubuntu 10.04 LTS 'Lucid Lynx' and Ubuntu 12.04 LTS 'Precise Pangolin' are too old. You can either install a newer version of libpcre and register it with pkg-config or just let rust-pcre automatically build libpcre from source.

On Ubuntu 12.10 'Quantal Quetzal' and newer, install the libpcre3-dev package:

sudo apt-get install libpcre3-dev

Usage

The basic use of the library involves compiling a pattern regular expression:

let mut re = match Pcre::compile(pattern) {
    Err(err) => {
        // compilation failed
        return;
    },
    Ok(re) => re
};

You can also pass options:

let mut compile_options: EnumSet<CompileOption> = EnumSet::new();
compile_options.insert(CompileOption::Caseless);
let mut re = Pcre::compile_with_options(pattern, &compile_options).unwrap();

To test against a subject string, use one of the exec(), exec_from(), or exec_from_with_options() methods. For example:

let m = match re.exec(subject) {
    None => { println("No match"); return; },
    Some(m) => m
};

See the source of pcredemo for a complete example.

Dependencies