#kubernetes #kubeconfig

app kcfg

KUBECONFIG manipulation CLI

5 releases

0.2.1 Dec 1, 2022
0.2.0 Dec 1, 2022
0.1.2 Oct 22, 2021
0.1.1 Oct 20, 2021
0.1.0 Oct 14, 2021

#469 in Web programming

Custom license

38KB
815 lines

kcfg

pipeline status unsafe forbidden MIT licensed Crates.io dependency status

Sometimes, you have to deal with many kubeconfig files. kcfg is here to help you !

Installation

Via Cargo:

cargo install kcfg

Homebrew:

brew install kcfg

Commands

Available commands:

  • fork Duplicates the current KUBECONFIG file and uses it as KUBECONFIG
  • completions Generates tab-completion script for your shell
  • help Print this message or the help of the given subcommand(s)
  • init Initializes the environment relative to your current path
  • use Find and use the correct KUBECONFIG

fork

Fork duplicate the current $KUBECONFIG file and uses it as $KUBECONFIG. This command will print the command to use to export the new file as the new $KUBECONFIG environment variable.

Flags

  1. -o --overwrite The forked configuration will not use any timestamp in its file name, meaning it will overwrite previous forks of the configuration.

  2. -n --no-export The program will not try to set the forked file path will as the new $KUBECONFIG environment variable.

Options

  1. -p --target-path Target directory for the forked configuration.

Init

Initializes the environment relative to your current path. This command will print the initialization script on the standard output.

Argument

The commands takes a value between:

  • common (default value): the program will output a common initialization script
  • bash: the program will output a bash initialization script
  • zsh: the program will output a zsh initialization script

Options

  1. -p --path

Define a custom initialization path. Otherwise the current path will be used.

Use

Parses recursively the kubeconfig directory (~/.kube by default) and retrieves the configuration file matching the parameters. The program will output the command to export the found file as the new KUBECONFIG environment variable.

Arguments

The command takes filter arguments to find the correct file.a

Options

  1. -d --directory

Allows to specify a custom kubeconfig directory instead of the default ~/.kube

Completion scripts (inspired by rustup documentation)

Command: kcfg completions

Enable tab completion for Bash, Fish, Zsh, or PowerShell. The script is output on stdout, allowing one to re-direct the output to the file of their choosing. Where you place the file will depend on which shell, and which operating system you are using. Your particular configuration may also determine where these scripts need to be placed.

Here are some common set-ups for the three supported shells under Unix and similar operating systems (such as GNU/Linux).

BASH:

Completion files are commonly stored in /etc/bash_completion.d/ for system-wide commands, but can be stored in ~/.local/share/bash-completion/completions for user-specific commands.

Run the command:

$ mkdir -p ~/.local/share/bash-completion/completions

$ kcfg completions bash >> ~/.local/share/bash-completion/completions/kcfg

This installs the completion script. You may have to log out and log back in to your shell session for the changes to take effect.

BASH (macOS/Homebrew):

Homebrew stores bash completion files within the Homebrew directory. With the bash-completion brew formula installed, run the command:

$ mkdir -p $(brew --prefix)/etc/bash_completion.d

$ kcfg completions bash > $(brew --prefix)/etc/bash_completion.d/kcfg.bash-completion

FISH:

Fish completion files are commonly stored in $HOME/.config/fish/completions.

Run the command:

$ mkdir -p ~/.config/fish/completions

$ kcfg completions fish > ~/.config/fish/completions/kcfg.fish

This installs the completion script. You may have to log out and log back in to your shell session for the changes to take effect.

ZSH:

ZSH completions are commonly stored in any directory listed in your $fpath variable. To use these completions, you must either add the generated script to one of those directories, or add your own to this list.

Adding a custom directory is often the safest bet if you are unsure of which directory to use. First create the directory; for this example we'll create a hidden directory inside our $HOMEdirectory:

$ mkdir ~/.zfunc

Then add the following lines to your .zshrc just before compinit:

fpath+=~/.zfunc

Now you can install the completions script using the following command:

$ kcfg completions zsh > ~/.zfunc/_kcfg

You must then either log out and log back in, or simply run

$ exec zsh

for the new completions to take effect.

CUSTOM LOCATIONS:

Alternatively, you could save these files to the place of your choosing, such as a custom directory inside your $HOME. Doing so will require you to add the proper directives, such as sourceing inside your login script. Consult your shells documentation for how to add such directives.

POWERSHELL:

The powershell completion scripts require PowerShell v5.0+ (which comes with Windows 10, but can be downloaded separately for Windows 7 or 8.1).

First, check if a profile has already been set

PS C:> Test-Path $profile

If the above command returns False run the following

PS C:> New-Item -path $profile -type file -force

Now open the file provided by $profile (if you used the New-Item command it will be ${env:USERPROFILE}\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1

Next, we either save the completions file into our profile, or into a separate file and source it inside our profile. To save the completions into our profile simply use

PS C:> kcfg completions powershell >> ${env:USERPROFILE}\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1

Dependencies

~4.5–6MB
~108K SLoC