4 releases

0.1.3 Nov 9, 2020
0.1.2 Nov 7, 2020
0.1.1 Nov 6, 2020
0.1.0 Nov 6, 2020

#210 in HTTP server

42 downloads per month

MIT/Apache

30KB
587 lines


lib.rs:

A library to assist in reporting on the health of a system.

Usage

In order to integrate with this library, a module will need to implement the Checkable trait.

Consumers can implement the Checkable trait directly or provide a function that can perform the health check. Such a function can be either synchronous or asynchronous.

Synchronous checker

Synchronous checker functions have the form Fn() -> Result<(), Error> and can be created with check_fn().

# use std::fmt::Error;
use health::Checkable;

fn all_is_well() -> Result<(), Error> { Ok(()) }
fn everything_is_fire() -> Result<(), Error> { Err(Error {}) }

let always_ok = health::check_fn("ok", all_is_well);
let always_bad = health::check_fn("bad", everything_is_fire);

Asynchronous checker

Asynchronous checker functions have the form async Fn() -> Result<(), Error> and can be created with check_future().

# use std::fmt::Error;
use health::Checkable;

async fn all_is_well() -> Result<(), Error> { Ok(()) }
async fn everything_is_fire() -> Result<(), Error> { Err(Error {}) }

let always_ok = health::check_future("ok", all_is_well);
let always_bad = health::check_future("bad", everything_is_fire);

Periodic background health checks

Once a Checkable is created, that can be passed to a PeriodicChecker<C>, which implements the Reporter trait. The periodic checker can be configured to define the parameters for reporting a health status.

Health checks are performed periodically in the background and not inline to requests for the current health status. This ensures that information about the current health status is always available without delay, which can be particularly important for health checking endpoings on web servers (such as the oft-seen /healthz and /health endpoints).

Example

# use std::{fmt::Error, future::Future};
use std::time::Duration;
use health::Reporter;

async fn all_is_well() -> Result<(), Error> { Ok(()) }
let always_ok = health::check_future("ok", all_is_well);

let reporter = health::PeriodicChecker::new(always_ok, health::Config {
    check_interval: Duration::from_secs(10),
    leeway: Duration::from_secs(30),
    min_successes: 2,
    min_failures: 6,
});

// Spawn the reporter on your executor to perform
// periodic checks in the background
# fn spawn<T>(t: T)
# where
#     T: Future + Send + 'static,
#     T::Output: Send + 'static,
# {}
spawn(reporter.clone().run());

assert_eq!(health::Status::Healthy, reporter.raw_status());
assert_eq!(Some(health::Status::Healthy), reporter.status());
assert_eq!(health::Check::Pass, reporter.last_check());

Tracing

This library makes use of the tracing library to report on the health status of resources using the health target. The PeriodicChecker<C> uses the following event levels when reporting the health status after each check is complete:

  • ERROR when the health status is unhealthy, and the most recent check failed.
  • WARN when the health status is healthy, but the most recent check failed.
  • INFO when the health status is unhealthy, but the most recent check passed.
  • INFO for the report when an unhealthy resource becomes healthy.
  • DEBUG when the health status is healthy, and the most recent check passed.

Features

  • tokio_0_3 (default): Uses tokio v0.3 to space out periodic health checks
  • tokio_0_2: Uses tokio v0.2 to space out periodic health checks
  • tracing (default): Uses the tracing library to report the results of periodic health checks

Dependencies

~1.1–1.7MB
~35K SLoC