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0.1.2 Apr 27, 2024
0.1.1 Apr 25, 2024
0.1.0 Apr 25, 2024

#51 in Programming languages

Download history 455/week @ 2024-04-25 16/week @ 2024-05-02

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MIT license

62KB
1.5K SLoC

CPROJ-RS

Description

Cproj is a basic c/c++ build tool that wraps gcc/g++ (or an equivalent) to enable incremental compilation. It was mainly meant as a fun side project but I figured some people might be interested in it.

To use a compiler that isn't gcc/g++ it must be an equivalent to them. This means that they must use the same flags for the same purposes as gcc/g++ since cproj was made to interface with gcc/g++ specifically. If you wish to make cproj work with a different compiler, feel free to fork the repo.

Installation Instructions

Cproj can be installed in two ways: With cargo or by building from source.

Installing with Cargo

  1. Ensure you have cargo installed, it can be installed using this guide
  2. Run cargo install cproj-rs

Building from Source

  1. Ensure you have cargo installed, it can be installed using this guide
  2. Clone the repository
  3. In the project root, run cargo install --path .

If you wish to avoid cloning the repository manually, you can instead do cargo install --git https://github.com/DeveloperGY/cproj-rs

Usage

Creating a Project

To create a project using Cproj, run cproj new <project_name>

This will create a new C project in a directory named after the project.

If you wish to make a C++ project instead you can specify the --lang flag with "c++" or "cpp". The --lang flag is case-insensitive. You may also specify that it is a C project by specifying the --lang flag with "c", though Cproj creates a C project by default.

The name of the project may optionally be marked by the --name flag but it isn't necessary.

Initializing a Project

If you already have a directory you wish to initialize with a project, run cproj init <project_name>

This will create a new C project in the current directory. You can change the project language using the --lang flag as detailed above.

The project name can be tagged with the --name flag, just as it can with cproj new, or it can be omitted to tell Cproj to use the name of the current directory instead.

Building/Running a Project

Cproj keeps track of file changes to enable incremental compilation. It does this through checking the last time files were modified. Some systems may not support this according to the rust docs, in which case Cproj will always rebuild the entire project.

Cproj will only look for changes in the src directory of the project. Cproj expects that no other files that the project is dependent on will change. There will be more details on this in the Project Configuration section.

To build a project, run cproj build

This will build the project in debug mode. If you wish to build in release mode, you can specify the --release flag. Optionally, if you wish to make it more clear that you intend to build in debug mode, you can specify the --debug flag.

The project will be built in the ./bin/[debug, release] directory. In this directory you will find the binary along with a timestamp file.

The timestamp file is used to keep track of the time the project was last built in that mode. If the timestamp file is edited and there were changes made to the source code of the project since the last time the project was build, it would be worth running cproj clean (documented below) or deleting the timestamp file. This will force Cproj to rebuild the entire project next time it is built.

Within this directory you will also find two folders, log and obj. The log folder holds all of the build logs for the previous build. If there were any source files that Cproj decided did not need to be rebuilt, then their previous log will be left untouched. The obj folder holds all of the object files built by cproj. If any of them get deleted while the corresponding source file was not it would be worth running cproj clean or deleting the timestamp file. This will force Cproj to rebuild the entire project. The reason you must do this is because Cproj currently does not check the obj folder to see if a source file needs to be marked for compilation. This is planned to be fixed in the future.

If you want to run your project after building it, you can do two things.

  1. You can run cproj run

This will build the project in debug mode and then run it. If you wish to run the project in release mode you can specify the --release flag. Optionally, if you wish to make it more clear that you intend to build in debug mode, you can specify the --debug flag.

  1. You can run cproj build and then run the binary yourself.

This option can be advantagous if you don't want to see the build output of Cproj when you run your project since Cproj will always run cproj build before running the project.

Cleaning the project

If you want to rebuild the entire project or the object files/timestamp file was messed with you can run cproj clean

The implementation of this command is relatively naive and just removes the project bin directory with all of its contents then recreates the folder structure.

If you wish to clean a specific build of the project, just go into the directory of the build and remove all the files. Be sure to leave the log and obj folders as Cproj will error out if it doesnt find them.

Alternatively, if you just wish to fully rebuild the project, remove the corresponding timestamp file for the mode you wish to rebuild in.

It is planned to make the Cproj clean system a bit more robust in the future.

The Help Command

To get some basic usage details of Cproj, you can run cproj help

The output of this command currently is not as thorough as this README so it's only really worth using if you don't have an internet connection.

There are plans to make this command much better in the future.

Configuring a Project

A Cproj project is marked by a file called cproj.json. The file looks like this by default.

{
  "name": "project_name",
  "cc": "gcc",
  "include": [
    "include"
  ],
  "lib": [
    "lib"
  ],
  "link_flags": [],
  "debug_flags": ["-Wall", "-Wextra"],
  "release_flags": ["-Wall", "-Wextra", "-O2"],
  "lang": "C"
}

The name field specifies the project name. It is used to name the output binary when building the file.

The cc field is the program used to compile the project.

The include field specifies the paths to include with -I to the program specified by cc. Cproj will not look for changes in any of the folders specified here. This means that if you update a dependency of your project, your source files will not recompile with those changes until those source files themselves get changed or you clean the project.

The lib field specifies the paths to include with -L to the progran specified by cc. Cproj will not look for changes in any of the folders specified here. Unlike with the include field, when used properly, Cproj should include changes to any libaries being linked to when rebuilding the project.

The link_flags field specifies all the flags that should be passed to the link stage. This is also where you should put all of your -l flags to link to any libraries your project needs.

The debug_flags field specifies all the flags that should be passed to the compilation stage when building the project in debug mode.

The release_flags field specifies all the flags that should be passed to the compilation stage when building the project in release mode.

The lang field specifies the project language. It can be either "C" or "Cpp". This field is case-sensitive. If any values other than "C" or "Cpp" are used, then any Cproj command that needs to read the project config will fail. This field helps Cproj to determine which source files to check for changes. The following lists the file extensions Cproj checks for each language.

C

  • .c
  • .h
  • .i

Cpp

  • .c
  • .cc
  • .cp
  • .cxx
  • .cpp
  • .CPP
  • .c++
  • .C
  • .i
  • .ii
  • .h
  • .hh
  • .H
  • .hp
  • .hxx
  • .hpp
  • .HPP
  • .h++
  • .tcc

These file extensions were determined based on the gcc manual

Contributing

Currently this is mainly my own side project and until I'm satisfied with my progress/effort I'd like to keep outside contributions to a minimum. That being said, submitting issues or forking the repo is perfectly fine and encouraged. My wish to measure my own progress as a developer should not impact other peoples' right to modify and improve a tool they use. I'm sorry for any inconvenience this may cause.

Once the project is in a state where I'm happy with it I will update this section and will be willing merge outside contributions.

Dependencies

~0.6–1.4MB
~32K SLoC